Thread: Random Reading Thoughts and Beyond

  1. #1861
    That's Wacist! Mistwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Province
    Los Angeles, CA
    Oratio
    26,387

    Ignore User
    I've got only a few books left until I finish the 41-book Discworld series. They get better over time, and the last quarter are the best, right until the alzheimer's starts to rob him near the end. Some fantastic books in there, shadowed by the tragedy that he's cut off not long after he finally hit his peak and stride after decades of writing.
    I like hats.

 

  • #1862
    Pony Up! Ovinomancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Province
    The Paddock
    Oratio
    28,033

    Ignore User
    Night Watch, Monstrous Regiment, and Going Postal are the top of the ouvre.
    Quote Originally Posted by PWD View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member.
    I think ovi's right.

  • #1863
    56% of an excuse nail bunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Province
    Kekistan
    Oratio
    30,383

    Ignore User
    Quote Originally Posted by Ovinomancer View Post
    Night Watch, Monstrous Regiment, and Going Postal are the top of the ouvre.
    Ugh. Monstrous Regiment is soooo anvilicious it's almost terrible.
    I wouldn't even censor you.

  • #1864
    Pony Up! Ovinomancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Province
    The Paddock
    Oratio
    28,033

    Ignore User
    Quote Originally Posted by nail bunny View Post
    Ugh. Monstrous Regiment is soooo anvilicious it's almost terrible.
    Didn't like the socks, eh?

    EDIT: Like in Night Watch and Going Postal, Pratchett works in some nice subtleties under the blunt instruments in Monstrous Regiment.
    Quote Originally Posted by PWD View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member.
    I think ovi's right.

  • #1865
    56% of an excuse nail bunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Province
    Kekistan
    Oratio
    30,383

    Ignore User
    Quote Originally Posted by Ovinomancer View Post
    Didn't like the socks, eh?

    EDIT: Like in Night Watch and Going Postal, Pratchett works in some nice subtleties under the blunt instruments in Monstrous Regiment.
    I won't disagree... but unlike Night Watch and Going Postal the lack of subtlety in his messaging was tremendous in Monstrous Regiment.
    I wouldn't even censor you.

  • #1866
    That's Wacist! Mistwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Province
    Los Angeles, CA
    Oratio
    26,387

    Ignore User
    Quote Originally Posted by Ovinomancer View Post
    Night Watch, Monstrous Regiment, and Going Postal are the top of the ouvre.
    I like all three as well.

    I am pretty fond of the witch books, including the Tiffany Aching ones. Most of the Vimes books are great.
    I like hats.

  • #1867
    56% of an excuse nail bunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Province
    Kekistan
    Oratio
    30,383

    Ignore User
    Quote Originally Posted by Mistwell View Post
    I like all three as well.

    I am pretty fond of the witch books, including the Tiffany Aching ones. Most of the Vimes books are great.
    Vimes is best, followed by Granny Weatherwax, Tiffany Aching, and Moist von Lipwig (if we're talking series that is*).


    Since none of the characters are as good as Cohen. Unfortunately Cohen often means having Rincewind in the book... and I hate that character.
    I wouldn't even censor you.

  • #1868
    That's Wacist! Mistwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Province
    Los Angeles, CA
    Oratio
    26,387

    Ignore User
    I just posted this on FB and figured it was worth a copy over here.

    Discworld Series, by Terry Pratchett: I’ve just finished the last book, The Shepherd's Crown (number 41), and felt compelled to say something about the series as a whole.

    I first began the series in the mid 1980s or so, with The Colour of Magic. I guess you could say I’ve been reading this series for over 30 years. But of course, not that entire time. Like many, I read a few early on, put it aside, and only returned many years later. Mostly I re-started it from the beginning a few years ago, took a year-and-a-half break in between, and then returned where I had left off to sprint through the end.

    But over that 30 years, the series had some level of presence in the back of my mind the entire time. No matter where I was with reading novels in my life, I knew there was always another Discworld novel at some time in my future.

    And now, there isn’t.

    Terry Pratchett, who died two years ago while putting the finishing touches on this last novel, was a remarkable author. Most of those people I am connected to who enjoy fantasy have read at least a few of the Discworld novels, mostly the first few like I did initially.

    I think all authors get better at their craft with experience, just as most professionals of any kind do.

    But Terry Pratchett, he got REALLY good over time. Better than most. With a more noteworthy improvement than most. His earlier novels, while enjoyable, are like pale comedic shadows of his later work.

    As the series progressed, mostly in the later half of his life’s work, there was a powerful change in his writing. They went from pleasant popcorn, to genuine page-turners which left me thinking once each novel was finished.

    The novels were always enjoyable romps with huge doses of puns and tongue in cheek commentary, usually as a parody of something else already popular. And they didn’t lose those elements over the years, though some did see a decrease depending on the topic.

    The first change I noticed was the characterization, plots, and carry-through of the setting got so much better with time. These go from mostly-silly characters to people you care about, and who you understand. I know Sam Vimes, Granny Weatherwax, and Tiffany Aching like they're friends who live far away. And the places they lived in felt much more real. Discworld, and some of its locales like Ankh-Moorpark and Lancre and the Chalk, transformed from mere names to lands close to the heart, like Hogwarts, or Middle Earth.

    The second change I noticed over time was that the novels took on much more difficult topics. They remained fun and light, but there were very serious subjects being grappled with (though not in a preachy way). Concerning how we deal with people who are different than us, how to overcome our inherent prejudices, and why we have such prejudices. What meaning religion has in our lives. How we truly become adults, and what we lose and gain as we do. How our society evolves economically and socially. Love, and tragedy.

    And yes, magic. Because Discworld, while feeling like our own world most of the time, remains a fanciful flat round disc of a world resting on the backs of four planetary-sized cosmic elephants who are themselves standing on the shell of a planet-sized cosmic turtle slowly swimming through space. Terry Pratchett would not want anyone to forget that. I suspect because he always wanted to remind people that no matter how serious life is, you have to have a good dose of silly added in there to make it all right.

    And so now that the adventure has ended for me (though I suspect I will revisit some of these books again in my future), I try to temper my sense of melancholy over having reached the end, with a dose of joy over all the amazing things I’ve read.

    If you tried the Discworld series at some point in your life and found them fun mostly throw-away fantasy popcorn, I strongly encourage you to pick them up again. Once you cross the half-way mark, I suspect you will notice what I did. It’s rare these days for me to find a series which I can’t put down, and this series becomes that over time. It’s worth the time devoted to it.
    I like hats.

  • #1869
    a figment of your imagination COMMUNITY SUPPORTER Palaralae's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Province
    Northern Idaho
    Oratio
    3,187

    Ignore User
    Quote Originally Posted by Mistwell View Post
    I just posted this on FB and figured it was worth a copy over here.

    Discworld Series, by Terry Pratchett: I’ve just finished the last book, The Shepherd's Crown (number 41), and felt compelled to say something about the series as a whole.
    Did you know that Steeleye Span (iconic Brit folk-rock group from way back, not sure if you're familiar with them) recently did a 2-disc album called "Wintersmith" based on Pratchett's book of the same title? I haven't read that much Pratchett, but I really like the album and the general gist of the premise I got from it.

    Also probably 'cause I have this strange fascination with Morris dancing, and the best song on there has the chorus that goes:

    Dance the Dark Morris
    you will find
    summer turns to wintertime
    deep in the forest
    clad in black
    dance the Dark Morris
    you may never dance back


    Oh, just give it a listen. I never pass up an opportunity to inflict music on someone.

    News I bring;
    Bells the stag, winter snow
    Summer is past
    Wind high and cold
    Low the sun, short its course
    Seas run strong;
    The russet bracken its shape is lost
    Wild goose raises wanton cry
    Cold lays hold on wings of bird
    Time of ice
    This I heard.

    -9th c. Irish

  • #1870
    I read Daemon by Daniel Suraez this weekend, and it was a very good book. It's "science" or rather it's IT aspect is pretty close to reality (especally reality today) to make it extremely rivetting. It could almost happen (though there are aspects that are a bit more far-fetched, it might be as close as you get in the genre of techno-thrillers, especially since most of the individual pieces of the story and technology are realistic.)

  • #1871
    a figment of your imagination COMMUNITY SUPPORTER Palaralae's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Province
    Northern Idaho
    Oratio
    3,187

    Ignore User
    Anybody read the "Mortal Engines" tetralogy? Any recommendations for/against?

    I'm pretty intrigued by the trailer that's out for the movie, though it's pretty short and not showing us very much. Will be Highly Interested in seeing this in December.
    News I bring;
    Bells the stag, winter snow
    Summer is past
    Wind high and cold
    Low the sun, short its course
    Seas run strong;
    The russet bracken its shape is lost
    Wild goose raises wanton cry
    Cold lays hold on wings of bird
    Time of ice
    This I heard.

    -9th c. Irish

  • Page 125 of 125 FirstFirst ... 2575106107108109110111112113114115116117118119120121122123124125

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •