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Thread: reveal's Daily Trivia 12.5.18

  1. #1

    reveal's Daily Trivia 12.5.18

    What television show's theme song included the words "Schlemiel! Schlimazel!"? Answered

    Laverne & Shirley. The Yiddish words refer to a clumsy and an unlucky person, respectively; the rest of the song is in English.
    Last edited by reveal; December 5th, 2018 at 03:28 PM.
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    Workman Publishing Company
    225 Varick Street
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    212-254-8098 (fax)
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  • #2
    Laverne & Shirley
    Fiat justitia ruat coelum.

  • #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Advocatus Diaboli View Post
    Laverne & Shirley
    Laverne & Shirley. The Yiddish words refer to a clumsy and an unlucky person, respectively; the rest of the song is in English.
    If you participate in my Daily Trivia thread, do not look for the answer elsewhere and post it.

    Workman Publishing Company
    225 Varick Street
    New York, NY 10014-4381
    212-254-5900 (phone)
    212-254-8098 (fax)
    info@workman.com

  • #4
    Quote Originally Posted by reveal View Post
    Laverne & Shirley. The Yiddish words refer to a clumsy and an unlucky person, respectively; the rest of the song is in English.
    Except for the very next word, hasenpfeffer.
    Fiat justitia ruat coelum.

  • #5
    56% of an excuse nail bunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Advocatus Diaboli View Post
    Except for the very next word, hasenpfeffer.
    What do you mean that isn't english? It means "delicious German rabbit stew"
    I wouldn't even censor you.

  • #6
    Quote Originally Posted by nail bunny View Post
    What do you mean that isn't english? It means "delicious German rabbit stew"
    It's a German word in common* usage here. I keep waiting for Trump to deport words that aren't British/American in origin. It would shrink the average vocabulary to something closer to his own.

    *for certain values of common
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  • #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Advocatus Diaboli View Post
    It's a German word in common* usage here. I keep waiting for Trump to deport words that aren't British/American in origin. It would shrink the average vocabulary to something closer to his own.

    *for certain values of common
    Are you sure hasenpfeffer didn't come to America from Britland via the Germanic British royal family?
    I wouldn't even censor you.

  • #8
    Quote Originally Posted by nail bunny View Post
    Are you sure hasenpfeffer didn't come to America from Britland via the Germanic British royal family?
    Hmm. No, I'm not. I just sort of assumed that rabbit stew would be a commoner's meal, not the haute cuisine* of a royal's table. I think that's usually the case for "traditional" meals of any given culture.

    *another phrase to be deported
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    a figment of your imagination COMMUNITY SUPPORTER Palaralae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Advocatus Diaboli View Post
    Hmm. No, I'm not. I just sort of assumed that rabbit stew would be a commoner's meal, not the haute cuisine* of a royal's table.
    Depends on how it's prepared, really, that decides the 'class' of the dish. I have medieval recipes for what we consider to be very cheap/lowbrow meats, but the way they're prepared and the ingredients added make them fit for a king's table. Peasants were more likely to be eating rabbit when it came to wild game, but that was because they were restricted to hunting on common lands; only landed nobility could hunt on otherwise owned land, where game was likely to be more diverse and plentiful since forests/preserves were actually managed.

    And if you wanted to keep your life/body intact, you sure as shit didn't poach, especially big game.
    Last edited by Palaralae; December 8th, 2018 at 02:36 AM.
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  • #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Palaralae View Post
    Depends on how it's prepared, really, that decides the 'class' of the dish. I have medieval recipes for what we consider to be very cheap/lowbrow meats, but the way they're prepared and the ingredients added make them fit for a king's table.
    Ah, okay.


    Quote Originally Posted by Palaralae View Post
    Peasants were more likely to be eating rabbit when it came to wild game, but that was because they were restricted to hunting on common lands; only landed nobility could hunt on otherwise owned land, where game was likely to be more diverse and plentiful since forests/preserves were actually managed.

    And if you wanted to keep your life/body intact, you sure as shit didn't poach, especially big game.
    And this was a big part of my assumption that rabbit stew was 'peasant food.'
    Fiat justitia ruat coelum.

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