Thread: Living Under the Boot Heel of Our New Orange Overlord

  1. #2866
    56% of an excuse nail bunny's Avatar
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  • #2867
    Quote Originally Posted by nail bunny View Post
    About time you admit the "alt-right" is fascism rebranded.
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  • #2868
    consequences 3catcircus's Avatar
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    It's all falling apart - that bullshit house of cards that the Dems have been relying on in their refusal to accept reality.

    No collusion.
    Avenatti arrested.
    Let's we see what else is coming down the pike.

  • #2869
    Quote Originally Posted by 3catcircus View Post
    It's all falling apart - that bullshit house of cards that the Dems have been relying on in their refusal to accept reality.

    No collusion.
    Avenatti arrested.
    Let's we see what else is coming down the pike.
    Personally, I only half thought there would be collusion, though I'm not sure how he reached that conclusion when Manafort provided Republican data to Russian intel operatives.

    Don't give a fuck about Avenatti.

    Gotta wonder about the thinking behind giving the decision about obstruction prosecution to Barr. Also, that particular question has another aspect. If it wasn't obstruction, it sure as fuck was abuse of power. So is that impeachable?

    Further, anyone think that Trump is going to pardon Manafort? And what will be the response if he does?

  • #2870
    self admitted prolifer kirinke's Avatar
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    Obstruction can exist without collusion as can abuses of power.

    At a guess, they'll get him on the old standbys of fraud (various kinds), tax evasion, obstruction of justice, witness tampering, witness intimidation and money laundering.

    And 3cat, before you point and laugh, Mueller found plenty of wrong doing done by Trump's closest aids. So we might not be led by a traitor, but we're certainly being led by an ignorant, weak, thin-skinned buffoon with a poor judge of character at best. That's nothing to crow about dearie.

    Plus, until they release the report, nobody other than Republicans are going to believe the word of a Trump Yes-man.

    I mean, look at the results of the Mueller investigation, how many indictments, how many convictions? That's alot of slime and dirt and sheer corruption Trump surrounds himself with. No way he's clean.

    That's just one investigation. There's more out there.

    As for Avenatti, no sympathy.
    Last edited by kirinke; March 26th, 2019 at 01:52 AM.
    Madness does not always howl. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "Hey, is there room in your head for one more?"

    I is before E except after C, then it's chaos man, mass chaos! Letters coming together into words, but then you go English and they put U's in places that just shouldn't go there... AHHHHHH!!!!!!!!

    My sanity left town along time ago and didn't leave a forwarding address. It's not missed.

  • #2871
    Don junior, Manafort and the Russian operatives just didn't say what really went down during the meeting. Not surprising, and without hard evidence collusion was hard to prove.

    Why Trump wasn't questioned on the obstruction remains political. He would have needed to explain why he said he fired Comey to stop the investigation into Russian collusion on national TV. Mueller didn't want the investigation to be political. Sadly.
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  • #2872
    Pony Up! Ovinomancer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kirinke View Post
    Obstruction can exist without collusion as can abuses of power.

    At a guess, they'll get him on the old standbys of fraud (various kinds), tax evasion, obstruction of justice, witness tampering, witness intimidation and money laundering.

    And 3cat, before you point and laugh, Mueller found plenty of wrong doing done by Trump's closest aids. So we might not be led by a traitor, but we're certainly being led by an ignorant, weak, thin-skinned buffoon with a poor judge of character at best. That's nothing to crow about dearie.

    Plus, until they release the report, nobody other than Republicans are going to believe the word of a Trump Yes-man.

    I mean, look at the results of the Mueller investigation, how many indictments, how many convictions? That's alot of slime and dirt and sheer corruption Trump surrounds himself with. No way he's clean.

    That's just one investigation. There's more out there.

    As for Avenatti, no sympathy.
    Um, no, Mueller didn't find much wrong with Trump's closest aids. The only one prosecuted for non-process crimes was Manafort, and he was charged for things he did over a decade ago, not anything contemporary. The rest of them got hit for process crimes -- ie crimes created by the process of investigation, in this case lying to federal agents. I think it's an absolute travesty that the FBI charges for 1001 breaches when there's no other crime committed, but they've been doing that for many years (ever since the law was passed) and I've been against that ever since, so that's not a Trump team thing, either. I though it was bullshit when they got Martha Stewart on it, too. You don't do anything wrong, but the skilled interrogators from the FBI manage to con you into a question/answer session as friends, don't allow recordings, and then prosecute based on the written recollections of the talk, not even the contemporary notes taken. It's bullshit, though and through.
    Quote Originally Posted by PWD View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member.
    I think ovi's right.

  • #2873
    self admitted prolifer kirinke's Avatar
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    Nice try at the spin though you need to get your head out of Fox's sewage pipe.

    The reality is, they as a whole were charged with serious federal crimes. Lying and perjury are not light crimes. Don't try to make it out like it is.

    https://www.npr.org/2018/12/09/64344...-investigation

    Convicted: Paul Manafort

    Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort leaves federal court in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 30, 2017.
    Keith Lane/Getty Images

    President Trump's former campaign chairman pleaded guilty in September 2018 to conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to obstruct justice — charges that stemmed from a range of alleged crimes committed over more than a decade as a lobbyist and, later, a member of the Trump campaign.

    In pleading guilty, Manafort agreed to cooperate with the Mueller investigation. Less than three months later, though, the special counsel's office told a federal judge in Washington, D.C., that he had "breached the plea agreement."

    Manafort's attorneys insist he gave the government useful information, but prosecutors said Manafort committed new crimes "by lying to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Special Counsel's Office on a variety of subject matters."

    U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ruled that Manafort had intentionally lied to the special counsel's office, which meant Mueller's team was no longer bound by the plea agreement.

    At sentencing, Jackson ordered Manafort to serve 43 months in federal prison on top of the 47 months he was sentenced to serve in a separate case brought by the special counsel in Virginia. In all, he will serve just under 7 1/2 years.

    In the Virginia case — the first to reach trial for the Mueller investigation — prosecutors accused Manafort of failing to pay taxes on millions of dollars that he earned as a consultant for pro-Russia politicians in Ukraine and kept hidden from the IRS.

    The jury found Manafort guilty of eight counts in the sprawling tax and bank fraud case but deadlocked on 10 others, prompting U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III to declare a mistrial on those charges.

    Manafort had been facing as much as 24 years in prison, but Ellis told the court that such a penalty would have been "excessive," adding that Manafort had lived "an otherwise blameless life."

    In her sentencing decision, Jackson broke from that assessment. "It is hard to overstate the number of lies and the amount of fraud involved," she said of Manafort's case. "A significant portion of his career has been spent gaming the system," she also said.

    Pleaded guilty: Michael Cohen

    Michael Cohen, former personal lawyer to President Trump, exits the federal courthouse in New York City.
    Yana Paskova/Getty Images

    At one time, lawyer Michael Cohen said he would "take a bullet" for Donald Trump. But by pleading guilty in November 2018 to lying to Congress, Cohen raised new questions about Trump's business interests in Russia during a pivotal period of the 2016 presidential campaign.

    Cohen admitted that he lied when he told Congress that discussions about a potential Trump Tower project in Moscow ended in January 2016. Actually, he said, they continued through June of that year.

    According to court documents, Cohen also initially said that his overtures to the Russian government went unrequited, but as talks progressed, he eventually heard back from a top aide to Russian President Vladimir Putin: Dmitry Peskov.

    Cohen also pleaded guilty in August 2018 to five counts of tax evasion, one count of falsifying submissions to a bank and two campaign finance violations — a plea that directly implicated the president.

    The campaign finance violations stem from two payments that Cohen helped arrange ahead of Election Day 2016 to buy the silence of former Playboy model Karen McDougal and adult film actress Stephanie Clifford, also known as Stormy Daniels. The women say they had sexual relationships with Trump.

    Trump has acknowledged that he reimbursed Cohen for a $130,000 payment to Clifford — but denies the alleged relationships with both women.

    Cohen told a federal judge that he made the payments "in coordination with and at the direction of a candidate for federal office" and that he did so "for the principal purpose of influencing the election."

    On Dec. 12, 2018, Cohen was sentenced to 36 months in prison. He had been facing as much as 63 months. Cohen was also ordered to pay nearly $2 million for his crimes.

    Pleaded guilty: W. Samuel Patten

    W. Samuel Patten pleaded guilty in August 2018 to failing to register as a foreign agent for lobbying work he performed for a political party in Ukraine called Opposition Bloc.

    Prosecutors said Patten partnered with a Russian national to lobby on behalf of the pro-Russia party, providing political consulting to members, including an unnamed Ukrainian oligarch. They received more than $1 million for that work, which included setting up meetings with government officials and members of Congress and drafting op-eds to appear on behalf of the oligarch inside U.S. news outlets.

    Though unnamed in court papers, the Russian national is believed to be Konstantin Kilimnik, who for years worked closely with Manafort in Ukraine. Patten's case was brought by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia on a referral from the special counsel.

    Pleaded guilty: Rick Gates
    Like Manafort, Rick Gates was once a top aide to Trump, serving as his deputy campaign chairman during the 2016 presidential race and then later as a senior aide on the presidential inaugural committee.

    Before that, Gates spent years as Manafort's protégé.

    Gates agreed to cooperate with the Mueller investigation after pleading guilty in February 2018 to financial fraud and lying to federal investigators.

    He was originally charged alongside Manafort with conspiracy to launder money, making false statements and other charges in connection with their work advising Russia-friendly politicians in Ukraine.

    At Manafort's trial, Gates testified that he and his former partner used offshore bank accounts and wire transfers to hide money from the IRS. Gates faces as much as six years in prison. He has continued cooperating with the government as its investigations continue and has not yet been sentenced.

    Pleaded guilty: Alex van der Zwaan
    Alex van der Zwaan became the first person to be sentenced in the Mueller probe after he pleaded guilty to lying to investigators.

    The son-in-law of a Russia-based billionaire, van der Zwaan acknowledged in federal court in February 2018 that he had misled investigators about a conversation he had with Gates, the former Trump campaign aide, in September 2016.

    The conversation focused on a report that van der Zwaan's law firm prepared about the prosecution of Yulia Tymoshenko, a political rival of former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych.

    He was sentenced to 30 days in prison and a $20,000 fine.

    Pleaded guilty: Richard Pinedo

    Richardo Pinedo is a California man who in February 2018 pleaded guilty to identity fraud.

    Pinedo admitted to taking in tens of thousands of dollars by creating hundreds of bank accounts, often using stolen identities. He then sold those accounts on the Web to unidentified foreign users.

    It's unclear to what extent, if any, those users included suspects connected to the Russia investigation. But it's possible they were used as part of a scheme described by Mueller's office in which Russians intent on attacking the 2016 election moved money around the world to pay for virtual private networks, Web hosting services and other such cybertools.

    In an interview with The New York Times, Pinedo's attorney, Jeremy I. Lessem, said that if his client's actions did assist "any individuals, including foreign nationals, with interfering in the American presidential election, it was done completely without his knowledge or understanding."

    Pinedo was sentenced to six months in prison, six months of home confinement and 100 hours of community service.

    Pleaded guilty: Michael Flynn
    During the 2016 campaign, Michael Flynn led chants of "lock her up" at the Republican National Convention, and after Trump's victory, he was appointed to serve as his first national security adviser.

    But he lasted less than a month on the job before resigning, and in December 2017, he pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador during the transition.

    The single count against Flynn related to discussions with Ambassador Sergey Kislyak around two issues: Obama administration sanctions on Russia and a United Nations resolution condemning Israeli settlements.

    According to court documents, Flynn denied to investigators that he asked Kislyak to either defeat or delay the U.N. vote on settlements and that he also asked the Russians to refrain from retaliating against the sanctions. The government said Flynn was directed by "a very senior member" of the transition team.

    Flynn, a former Army general, would eventually admit to misleading the FBI about those conversations, and as part of his plea deal he agreed to cooperate with the special counsel's investigation. Ahead of his sentencing hearing, prosecutors said Flynn had provided "substantial" aid with "several ongoing investigations," telling a court his assistance merited a judge's consideration.

    Pleaded guilty: George Papadopoulos
    George Papadopoulos was the first person charged in the Mueller investigation and pleaded guilty in October 2017 to lying to the FBI.

    Papadopoulos was a junior foreign policy adviser to the Trump 2016 campaign — one of a number brought on early amid questions about who would advise Trump about foreign affairs. Trump once praised him as an "excellent guy."

    In January 2017, the FBI questioned Papadopoulos about his interactions with a professor based in London who had links to the Russian government. The official told Papadopoulos that the Russians had "dirt" on Hillary Clinton in the form of "thousands of emails," according to court documents.

    Prosecutors say Papadopoulos went on to use the professor's connections in an effort to arrange a meeting between the Trump campaign and Russian officials.

    In his interview with the FBI, Papadopoulos originally described the professor as "a nothing," but investigators said that, "In truth ... Papadopoulos understood that the professor had substantial connections to Russian government officials."

    Papadopoulos' attorney said when he was sentenced that he didn't recall whether he had communicated the information about the dirt on Clinton to his superiors on the Trump campaign.

    He was sentenced to 14 days in prison. In a statement provided to NPR after Papadopoulos' release in December 2018, his lawyer emphasized there was no evidence that he had colluded with Russia and that he has never been accused of doing so or of being involved in any plot to undermine the presidential election.

    STONE
    The seven counts against President Donald Trump's longtime friend and veteran political operative Roger Stone include one count of obstruction of an official proceeding, five counts of false statements -- including lying to Congress -- and one count of witness tampering in special counsel Robert Mueller's probe into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential election.

    The charges brought by Mueller's office largely revolve around false statements Stone is accused of making to the House Intelligence Committee regarding his communications with associates about Wikileaks. He also stands accused of witness tampering in connection with humorist and radio show host Randy Credico's testimony to the House Intelligence Committee. In Stone's 24-page indictment, Mueller painted perhaps the clearest picture yet of possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Read more here.
    https://abc7chicago.com/heres-a-brea...probe/5212377/
    Last edited by kirinke; March 26th, 2019 at 11:51 AM.
    Madness does not always howl. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "Hey, is there room in your head for one more?"

    I is before E except after C, then it's chaos man, mass chaos! Letters coming together into words, but then you go English and they put U's in places that just shouldn't go there... AHHHHHH!!!!!!!!

    My sanity left town along time ago and didn't leave a forwarding address. It's not missed.

  • #2874
    Republicans are now in to worshipping false idols at 45$ a golden calf. Seriously. https://thehill.com/blogs/blog-brief...8omwqcL47s-GBk
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  • #2875
    a figment of your imagination COMMUNITY SUPPORTER Palaralae's Avatar
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    I'm not sure whether to laugh in disbelief, mockery, or horror, honestly.
    It's a long way down and everything's broken
    It's crazy what some will do for love

    It's a long way down and the dark road is a serpent
    But you and I are not so different

    You can wish what you want
    Let us guide you home
    But we are not yours
    You better leave the stars alone

    Some give us names
    Some give us chains
    And some just try to give us away in vain
    We might be maidens
    We might be queens
    But we are not made to realize your dreams

  • #2876
    56% of an excuse nail bunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Palaralae View Post
    I'm not sure whether to laugh in disbelief, mockery, or horror, honestly.
    All three are probably appropriate for a Yablo post.
    I can delete you, one click and you're overwritten.

  • #2877
    Quote Originally Posted by nail bunny View Post
    All three are probably appropriate for a Yablo post.
    Considering I post about Trump and Nazis, that is correct.
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  • #2878
    self admitted prolifer kirinke's Avatar
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    Yablo on ignore is a good thing.
    Madness does not always howl. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "Hey, is there room in your head for one more?"

    I is before E except after C, then it's chaos man, mass chaos! Letters coming together into words, but then you go English and they put U's in places that just shouldn't go there... AHHHHHH!!!!!!!!

    My sanity left town along time ago and didn't leave a forwarding address. It's not missed.

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