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Thread: What was the first thing you learned to cook? Besides sandwiches.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turjan View Post
    The only explanation I can think of is that meat, especially beef, was so cheap nobody cared for stuff "the poor people eat".
    Replace "poor people" with a word that starts with N and rhymes with Tigger.

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  • #32
    Stage Name: Jackie! COMMUNITY SUPPORTER Nerfherder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nail bunny View Post
    I've always wanted to try it. Not enough to go to Engerland, but you know...
    http://britishflorida.com/british-foods-florida-2/

    I love that there's a coupon for an Indian restaurant
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  • #33
    56% of an excuse nail bunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerfherder View Post
    http://britishflorida.com/british-foods-florida-2/

    I love that there's a coupon for an Indian restaurant
    I wouldn't trust it to be authentic. If I knew someone who was raised in Britland and knew how to cook proper British food, I'd probably try it then.
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  • #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Turjan View Post
    It's not a specifically Germanic thing. You find it all over Europe, Asia and Latin America. It's mentioned in the Odyssey.
    Historically speaking, in an agrarian society life can be tough enough (depending on the luck & conditions of the year) that your culture evolves to not waste hardly anything, especially if you're poor. Blood is actually quite nutritious, the Mongols & other steppe cultures occasionally vampirize their horses and other animals as need and tastes arise.

    Quote Originally Posted by Turjan View Post
    For some reason, the US has this aversion against anything from animals that isn't meat from muscles. No idea why.

    The only explanation I can think of is that meat, especially beef, was so cheap nobody cared for stuff "the poor people eat".
    The US (and modern Western culture) has some odd food taboos/tastes, especially in contrast to other world cultures. When I tell people I eat my goats I often get a shocked/surprised reaction, like they wouldn't think to do that, and a surprising amount of people I run into have either never had lamb, or have only had it once or twice. I also get weird looks when I mention eating rabbit.

    Also the aversion to eating horsemeat, which I think is mostly silly and a waste; I think this has a huge partial explanation in that the Church outlawed it as a pagan practice.

    We tend not to eat organ meats either (because we view them as 'icky', I think), which is a big departure from older European culture, and even American tastes up until probably about the 40's/50's. I grew up eating heart (though I can't stand liver), and I remember my grandma talking about making/eating fried lung, as well as "sweetbreads", which can be either brain or testicles depending on the context.

    There's a whole lot of class-related stuff tied up in food, though, and there has been through history. I think it's more prevalent in modern Western culture due to the fact that there's no shortage of livestock, and we've gotten so fast at processing that any particular cut is pretty much available at any time, in any quantity. This means that if you're rich, you can eat whatever you want (and the food companies go all out to sell you the most expensive cuts), and if you're poor, you can still get some sort of meat a helluva lot more often than even probably your great-grandma would have if she had been in the same position. Industrialization meant that processors focused on only a few things (beef, chicken, pork) and all the other stuff either was done at home (which you didn't do if you lived in the city), done by the small local butcher shop guy (if you were lucky, and there was a market for it), or dropped out of availability entirely. This is one of the reasons why you can often find the more "oddball" stuff at ethnic grocers.

    Quote Originally Posted by shiningbrow View Post
    My German grandfather liked Hogs Head cheese, which seemed to have bits of snout and other normally discarded pig parts preserved in aspic, or other gelatin.
    Headcheese. Another throwback to culture that tried to use every part; you basically boil the whole pig's head & save everything that boils off and let it gel, which it naturally does because you just boiled a whole bunch of bone & cartilage.

    Quote Originally Posted by shiningbrow View Post
    He was trained, and worked for many years, as a butcher before switching to carpentry, so I can remember him slaughtering small animals for food: squirrels, rabbits, turtles, geese, chickens, etc.
    Yep, definitely a good skill to be able to process/eat what you can. I've done all those mentioned except turtle. Don't think I've ever had turtle. They're smallish up here, and probably not worth the trouble unless it's a survival situation, I guess.

    Quote Originally Posted by nail bunny View Post
    I wouldn't trust it to be authentic. If I knew someone who was raised in Britland and knew how to cook proper British food, I'd probably try it then.
    The Brits are mad for curry & all foods Indian. Didn't you ever watch Red Dwarf?! A lot of people came over to Britain during the colonisation as slaves & house workers, many of them cooks. Between that and having lots of immigration, Britain has a lot of authentic exotic foods, from what I've seen.
    Last edited by Palaralae; July 1st, 2016 at 06:56 PM.

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    Cockface! Turjan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiningbrow View Post
    My German grandfather liked Hogs Head cheese, which seemed to have bits of snout and other normally discarded pig parts preserved in aspic, or other gelatin.
    Head cheese is hit or miss in my experience. I don't like the sour variants, or those that are only salty. Pig snout isn't really "red", it's a bit chewy and nearly white. I'm fine with small pieces. Tongue is nice though.

    Most kinds of clear head cheese are relatively expensive, because the butcher can't hide the ingredients he uses, which means those tend to be of good quality. Still, I like the variants with blood better, as they tend to use spices I love, like allspice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nail bunny View Post
    I wouldn't trust it to be authentic. If I knew someone who was raised in Britland and knew how to cook proper British food, I'd probably try it then.
    Don't you have Latin Americans in Florida? Maybe you can find the Spanish and Latin American morcilla somewhere.


  • #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Turjan View Post
    Tongue is nice though.
    Imminent jokes aside, how could I have forgotten mentioning tongue?! Another traditionally-eaten thing in many cultures that most moderns are going to "Ewwww, ICK!" about, that I grew up eating. It is really delicious as well as easy to cook, and makes a really good sandwich meat for the leftovers.

    Dark the stars and dark the moon
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    Dark the oceans, dark the sky
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    Gone their master, gone their son.


  • #38
    Cockface! Turjan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Palaralae View Post
    Imminent jokes aside, how could I have forgotten mentioning tongue?! Another traditionally-eaten thing in many cultures that most moderns are going to "Ewwww, ICK!" about, that I grew up eating. It is really delicious as well as easy to cook, and makes a really good sandwich meat for the leftovers.
    Not sure about "easy to cook". You can make it smell and taste really weird if you don't season it properly.

    When I think of tongue, I mostly think of the head cheese with blood and tongue, which is really nice:



    Regarding imminent jokes, a popular rejection of eating tongue is "I don't eat what a cow had in its mouth".
    Last edited by Turjan; July 1st, 2016 at 07:24 PM.

  • #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Turjan View Post
    Not sure about "easy to cook". You can make it smell and taste really weird if you don't season it properly.

    When I think of tongue, I mostly think of the head cheese with blood and tongue, which is really nice:

    Regarding imminent jokes, a popular rejection of eating tongue is "I don't eat what a cow had in its mouth".
    That actually looks kinda good, though I haven't had breakfast yet, so hunger is the best sauce.

    For cooking tongue, we just brought it to boil it in a stockpot & turned it down to simmer for a while, or roasted it in the oven on low (basically like a braise). After it was cooked was usually when spices & stuff were added. \

    I keep thinking about a nice cold tongue sandwich with mustard on sourdough, now. Dammit.

    Dark the stars and dark the moon
    Hush the night and the morning loon
    Tell the horses and beat on your drum
    Gone their master, gone their son.

    Dark the oceans, dark the sky
    Hush the whales and the ocean tide
    Tell the salt marsh and beat on your drum
    Gone their master, gone their son.


  • #40
    56% of an excuse nail bunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Palaralae View Post
    The Brits are mad for curry & all foods Indian. Didn't you ever watch Red Dwarf?! A lot of people came over to Britain during the colonisation as slaves & house workers, many of them cooks. Between that and having lots of immigration, Britain has a lot of authentic exotic foods, from what I've seen.
    The "authenticity" comment was aimed at the restaurants on the website Nerf had linked to, being as those restaurants are in Florida, not England.
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  • #41
    Haulin ass shiningbrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turjan View Post
    Head cheese is hit or miss in my experience. I don't like the sour variants, or those that are only salty. Pig snout isn't really "red", it's a bit chewy and nearly white. I'm fine with small pieces. Tongue is nice though.

    Most kinds of clear head cheese are relatively expensive, because the butcher can't hide the ingredients he uses, which means those tend to be of good quality. Still, I like the variants with blood better, as they tend to use spices I love, like allspice.
    I remember the stuff my grandfather gave me and it was chewy and salty but not especially appealing. It wasn't bloody, but rather light and clear looking. I think he bought it commercially -- which is to say that he did not make it himself, although he grew up on a farm, and had huge vegetable gardens. I ate all kinds of weird stuff as a kid, particularly braunschweiger, which is some kind of liver sausage. After having some bad liver, I never ate it again. Another Maryland favorite was Rapa Brand Scrapple. It was a cornmeal, sage flavored breakfast food that came in slabs. You'd cut off about a quarter inch of it and fry it. It contained "pork by-products" which I think meant "everything but the oink."

    My great grandmother (Irish) loved pickled pigs feet. They kept them in large gallon jars at bars in Baltimore, sort of like pickled eggs, so you could indulge while knocking back some Natty Bo.
    Last edited by shiningbrow; July 2nd, 2016 at 06:47 AM.
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  • #42
    self admitted prolifer kirinke's Avatar
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    I saw Scrapple being made on Bizarre Foods. It looks a bit like home made Spam, only darker. Never had blood sausage and I hate the texture of organ parts.
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  • #43
    Quote Originally Posted by kirinke View Post
    I hate the texture of organ parts.
    You may not have had them cooked very well. I bet I could serve you tongue or heart, and you wouldn't even know it.

    I actually like the texture of heart, especially chicken hearts*. Ungulate heart is pretty good, too.



    *not the one that ate New York**.


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    Dark the stars and dark the moon
    Hush the night and the morning loon
    Tell the horses and beat on your drum
    Gone their master, gone their son.

    Dark the oceans, dark the sky
    Hush the whales and the ocean tide
    Tell the salt marsh and beat on your drum
    Gone their master, gone their son.


  • #44
    self admitted prolifer kirinke's Avatar
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    Never had tongue, I hear it is good if done right.
    Madness does not always howl. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "Hey, is there room in your head for one more?"

    I is before E except after C, then it's chaos man, mass chaos! Letters coming together into words, but then you go English and they put U's in places that just shouldn't go there... AHHHHHH!!!!!!!!

    My sanity left town along time ago and didn't leave a forwarding address. It's not missed.

  • #45
    Quote Originally Posted by kirinke View Post
    Never had tongue, I hear it is good if done right.


    It's quite good. Since you're in Texas, you should be able to find some place that does more authentic Mexican food and get it in a cooked dish. They often make tacos from it, tacos la lengua. Or if there's a place that has a deli that caters to Hispanics, they might have it cooked; there's a grocery store in the Tri-Cities that I travel to sometimes that has the most amazing deli, and even though I don't normally go for Mexican food, I will often stop there and get something from their deli in addition to browsing their bizarre (to me) produce section, as they get stuff in like cactus pads, tamarind pods, etc.

    Dark the stars and dark the moon
    Hush the night and the morning loon
    Tell the horses and beat on your drum
    Gone their master, gone their son.

    Dark the oceans, dark the sky
    Hush the whales and the ocean tide
    Tell the salt marsh and beat on your drum
    Gone their master, gone their son.


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